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Resources | Hysteria roll call: Computer Economics, Inc.

Counting the cost of Slammer
"Another analyst firm came up with similar estimates that measured the cost of cleanup rather than of lost productivity. Technology market researcher Computer Economics estimates that the worm cost between $750 million and $1 billion to clean up, said Mark McManus, vice president of technology and research for the Carlsbad, Calif., firm. 'The labor costs, although significant, weren't as bad as Code Red,' McManus said..."
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Data on Internet threats still out cold
News.com staff writer Rob Lemos looked at the history of what many computer security experts call "data." It didn't stand up under a scrutiny. "Even Michael Erbschloe, vice president at Computer Economics and the author of the company's estimates of the amount of damage done by viruses, admits the numbers are, scientifically, just a few steps up the evolutionary ladder from a guess..."
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Gypsys Tramps & Thieves
A story in the The Register (see below) cites two antivirus vendors who pooh-pooh the virus damage figures coming out of Computer Economics, Inc. Vmyths editor Rob Rosenberger turned the tables by pointing out the fact those same two vendors quote Computer Economics' figures in their own press releases...
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Lies, damned lies and anti-virus statistics
Reporter John Leyden of The Register observes "critics in the antivirus industry dismiss Computer Economics assessment of the damage caused by the combined effects of Nimda ($635 million), Code Red variants ($2.62 billion), SirCam ($1.15 billion) et al last year as 'guesstimate'... [But] Michael Erbschloe, vice president of research at Computer Economics, angrily rejected criticisms of its methodology and said its work helped firms decide how to defend against viruses..."
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Find the Cost of (Virus) Freedom
"Virus and worm attacks were at an all-time high in 2001, costing corporations billions of dollars, according to the news reports that followed each release of malicious code," begins Wired reporter Michelle Delio. But then she reveals those figures come from only one source: Computer Economics, Inc. "Many industry experts wonder how the company arrives at these seemingly exorbitant figures..."
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Initial Code Red guesstimate: $1.2 billion in damages
Vmyths editor Rob Rosenberger takes Computer Economics, Inc. and VP Michael Erbschloe to task for concocting yet another publicity stunt. Once again, the firm calculated damages to an absurdly accurate ±$10 million, worldwide...
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Code Red hysteria -- $8.7 billion in damage estimated
Computer Economics Inc. guesstimated damages at $1.2 billion for the first Code Red attack. Correspondent Thomas C. Green of The Register explains the obvious. "Reuters got the sensationalist quote they wanted from an 'expert'..."
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Computer Economics Inc. (part 2)
The company again revised its damage guesstimate for the ILoveYou virus. Vmyths editor Rob Rosenberger comes up with an embarrassing mathematical function to describe it...
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Computer Economics Inc. (part 1)
The company stopped issuing virus-damage guesstimates -- and Vmyths editor Rob Rosenberger claims he should get all the credit...
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Mathematical atrocity
Vmyths editor Rob Rosenberger complains again. Computer Economics Inc. calculated an absurdly accurate damage guesstimate for the ILoveYou virus...
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